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Management

What sources do I need?

Your assessments for MWL101 require you to use scholarly peer-reviewed journal articles, as well as reliable and current non-academic sources, to support your writing. If you want to excel at university, you should always follow your assignment instructions and provide the right kind of references.


Non-academic sources: trend reports

Industry Trend Reports (downloadable)

Deloitte Global Human Capital Trend - Rewriting the Rules for the Digital Age

Deloitte Soft Skills for Business Success - Building Australia's Future Workforce

The Future of Talent - Opportunities Unlimited


Non-academic sources: industry reports

Industry reports are non-academic sources which may include various information about the industry including analysis, key companies, outlook and performance information. You can use these sources to find out more about the industry that you want to work in. 

Use the following databases to find industry reports:

  • IBISWorld: IBISWorld contains current information on Australian industries. 
  • D&B Hoovers: D&B Hoovers contains industry reports on both international and Australian industries. 

Industry Trend Reports (downloadable)

Deloitte Global Human Capital Trend - Rewriting the Rules for the Digital Age

Deloitte Soft Skills for Business Success - Building Australia's Future Workforce

The Future of Talent - Opportunities Unlimited


 

Non-academic sources: magazines and web resources

Below are a number of magazines and online resources that you may find useful in this unit.


Non-academic sources: newspapers

Deakin Library subscribes to a number of databases that contain both Australian and international newspapers. Newspapers are non-academic sources that can provide you with information on your industry and on specific companies.

  • Factiva is a newspaper database that also lets your search for company and industry information (see help sheet below). 

TIP: If you use Google to search for newspaper article, you can filter your results by date. If you are ever asked to pay for an article, you can almost always get access for free through the Library databases.


Academic sources: journal articles

What does it mean when you are told to find and use 'academic/scholarly peer-reviewed journal articles'?

  • Peer-review means that the journal articles have been reviewed by experts in that field
  • Scholarly journals usually have the words 'Journal', 'Quarterly' or 'Review' in the title
  • Academic articles usually have an abstract, and a list of references

Find Scholarly Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles:

 

You can use Library Advanced Search to find journal articles across a wide variety of databases:

examples search: employability OR "graduate capabilities" AND "graduate students"

  • Use OR in between synonyms or alternative terms to broaden your search and get more results.
  • Use AND to add multiple concepts or keywords together to narrow your search.
  • Use "Quotes" to search for an exact phrase.

 

Select 'Scholarly (Peer Reviewed) Journals' from the left panel filter options. Here you can also filter the date for more current articles.

Alternatively, you can search in individual databases using the Library' A-Z Databases page.

Some key databases for Business include:

 


Evaluate your sources using the CRAAP test

When was the information published or posted?

Consider:

  • How current is the information?

  • Do you need current information, older sources or both?

  • When was the resource last updated?

  • If there are references and links, how current are they


Does it relate to my topic and needs?

Consider:

  • Who is the intended audience?

  • Does it help me answer a question or solve a problem?

  • Will it lead to other information?

  • Does it provide evidence for or support my ideas?

  • What does it add to my work?


Who is the source of the information?

Consider:

  • Who is the author, publisher, source or sponsor of the information?

  • Are the authors' and/or publishers' affiliations clear?

  • What is their reason for publishing the material?

  • For websites, does the domain of the URL tell you anything about the author or source (.gov, .edu, .com, .org)


Is the information true and accurate?

Consider:

  • Where does the information come from?

  • Is the information supported by evidence?

  • Can that evidence be verified if necessary?

  • Are there spelling, grammar or other errors?

  • Has the information been reviewed or refereed?


Why does the information exist?

Consider:

  • What is the purpose of the information?

  • Is the information factual or opinion?

  • Is the information biased?

  • Is the information to inform, teach, sell, entertain or persuade?

  • Is the website sponsored or influenced by advertising revenue?